Rome’s Ingenious Water Transport Systems

With the development of the first raised aqueduct in Rome, the Aqua Anio Vetus in 273 BC, individuals who lived on the city’s foothills no longer had to depend only on naturally-occurring spring water for their needs. Outside of these aqueducts and springs, wells and rainwater-collecting cisterns were the sole technologies available at the time to supply water to areas of greater elevation. To offer water to Pincian Hill in the early 16th century, they implemented the brand-new approach of redirecting the stream from the Acqua Vergine aqueduct’s underground channel. Pozzi, or manholes, were engineered at standard stretches along the aqueduct’s channel. During the some nine years he had the property, from 1543 to 1552, Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi used these manholes to take water from the channel in buckets, though they were actually built for the intent of maintaining and maintenance the aqueduct. The cistern he had made to collect rainwater wasn’t adequate to meet have a peek at this site his water requirements. Fortunately, the aqueduct sat below his residence, and he had a shaft opened to give him access.

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